Mar 27

Volvo 340dl 1.8 16v Engine Swap Resources

Pretty much since I first owned my Volvo 340 1.4, This engine swap has constantly been on my mind, so as I’ve entertained the idea, I researched and read about it extensively. I’m About To Provide you with all the information you need to swap your 1.4 Volvo 340 to a Clio Valver/ Williams engine. Alternatively If you already Have a 1.7, everything is pretty much in place.

How do I know its pretty much everything you need? I’ve used it all, extensively especially Jon-Ovlov’s Guide

Another great thing about this engine swap is the fact it’s become so common now, pretty much every problem you will encounter has been sorted. The support and problem advice on the Volvo 300 mania forums is priceless, it’s a fantastic community to be part of aswell.

I feel that along with my shared experience here (especially all the little things that turned out to be a pain!) and Jon’s Guide, you will have everything you need information wise to do it, Don’t Forget My Library of Images Aswell

If you have a 360 GLT 2.0 you can fit a turbo engine from one of the 740 or 240 volvo for big powers.  All the information for this swap can be found on the Volvo 300 mania forums, but its not as straight forward and the 360 GLT’s are so rare now.

If that is your thing though, apparently, on the later/ end of line Volvo 2.3 turbo engines the bottom end was forged, basically meaning its good for 500bhp+ and why it’s not a problem if one of these engines is a high miler. They are incredibly well built, and strong.

Here’s all the stuff I used then:

Adam/ 340GLT Conversion Parts All the custom parts on my car are made by Adam/340GLT, the reversed inlet manifold, the wiring loom and the fuel pump. Its worth paying to get parts off of him because he can help you as soon as you have any problems. Whats great about buying his custom loom aswell is everything is in place for the engines positioning in Volvo..Almost as if it was a factory car! I wen down recently and he completely rewired my car and got it running perfectly. Massive thanks, I actually love the car to bits now, its perfect.

Jon-Ovlov’s How To Guide – I printed this out in it’s entirety, It’s extensive, packed with huge pictures and lots of information, this was my constant go to through out the build.

Volvo 340 F7p F7r Conversion Parts– If you have a 1.4 Volvo and are doing it from scratch this is everything you need here, be sure to look through the “navigation menu” on the left, I didn’t realise theres was several pages for a while, this was a great help.

Speed Sensor– you’ll probably encounter this problem straight away after you finish your build, basically the engine idles really high after you give it the beans, and its due to a simple cable that goes on the back of the clocks

Volvo 300 mania Forums– Always Go here straight away if you have any problems, be it for a standard Volvo or an engine-swapped Volvo, The search function is a bit rubbish, but its worth delving through the posts to find your specific problem

Volvo 300 Mania Facebook Page This is just as good if not better than the forums, since everyone is on facebook all the time, you tend to get a quicker response. The BDC Volvo 300 Guys are farely active on here aswell, so you can get great expert advice sometimes, and its free :)

Speedy88’s F7r Build thread This is another personal build thread of a volvo 360 Saloon getting the F7r Treatment. Theres lots more to read through here than johns guide, since this thread is more a complete story of one persons ownership of the car and converting from a 1.7 to a williams. Great Pictures, Great Info.

  1. Volvo 340dl F7p Renault Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap/Replacement Part 1
  2. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Valver Engine Swap Part Two
  3. Volvo 340 1.8 16v F7p Engine Swap, Taking the Engine Out Part Three
  4. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v F7p Part Four, Prepping the New F7p To Go In!
  5. Volvo 340 Valver F7p Part Five 1.7 Bellhousing and Clutch Assembly
  6. Volvo 340dl Engine Swap Part Six, Getting the Clio 1.8 16v F7p Engine Back In
  7. Volvo 340 Valver Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap Final Part, Getting it Running
  8. Volvo 340dl 1.8 16v Engine Swap Resources

Pages

My Car

Volvo 340 1.8 16V f7P Valver First Drive Pictures and Wash

Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Retro Drift Car Build Pictures

 

Permanent link to this article: http://carsandcoolstuff.com/2013/03/volvo-340dl-1-8-16v-engine-swap-resources/

Mar 25

Volvo 340 Valver Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap Final Part, Getting it Running

So you’ve finally got the engine in and all the mechanical stuff done, now your pretty much ready.

First things first. Oil and water put oil in checking the level constantly and get some water and ant-freeze in there aswell. Once you’ve done that, hand crank the engine with a socket for a while and this will start to move oil around where it needs to go. Again keep an eye on the level and make sure its all good and the engine is cranking smoothly.

I thought connecting up all the loom was going to be an absolute nightmare. This was super daunting to me but since I took loads and loads of pictures before I took the engine out initially, that was an incredibly good reference point when we needed to get started and if we got stuck.

But don’t worry, it’s not actually that bad at all. Everything is colour coded with a very specific plug and socket arrangement.  Also the length of the cables are just so, i.e. the fuel rail sensors  are the correct length for each of the four cylinders, no unnecessary extra cable. This makes it pretty straight forward. The more you plug in the easier it get gets.

Another top tip would be to label everything as you disconnect it accordingly. This helped us a massive amount as it came back to putting it all back together, make a note of your labels in a notepad aswell.

Be sure to use my pictures as a reference point if you get stuck

Once we connected everything back up together.. the car still didn’t start, it took us a whole afternoon to find out why, we forgot to connect the alternator live feed.. little things. So double check everything if your having problems. Be sure you’ve not missed anything and always go back to basics when all else fails.

FINALLY.  The car was running. All that was left was to leave it idling for a while till it gets up to temperature. It also takes a while for all the oil to get around the engine. It’ll sound really rough and tappety at first as it’s running dry but give it a good half hour to an hour of idling and your there.

This is a good time to be checking that the fan is cutting on and off, theres no drips or leaks anywhere in the system, and pay close attention to all the dials aswell.

I couldn’t thank all my mates, and Volvo 300 mania Members enough, every step of the way there has been someone to help me out. It’s been a fantastic experience bought about by bad circumstances, who would of thought?? Check out all the pictures and first real run of it in my gallery.

Volvo 340 1.8 16v, completed

  1. Volvo 340dl F7p Renault Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap/Replacement Part 1
  2. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Valver Engine Swap Part Two
  3. Volvo 340 1.8 16v F7p Engine Swap, Taking the Engine Out Part Three
  4. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v F7p Part Four, Prepping the New F7p To Go In!
  5. Volvo 340 Valver F7p Part Five 1.7 Bellhousing and Clutch Assembly
  6. Volvo 340dl Engine Swap Part Six, Getting the Clio 1.8 16v F7p Engine Back In
  7. Volvo 340 Valver Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap Final Part, Getting it Running
  8. Volvo 340dl 1.8 16v Engine Swap Resources

Pages

My Car

Volvo 340 1.8 16V f7P Valver First Drive Pictures and Wash

Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Retro Drift Car Build Pictures

 

Permanent link to this article: http://carsandcoolstuff.com/2013/03/volvo-340-valver-clio-1-8-16v-engine-swap-final-part-getting-it-running/

Mar 25

Volvo 340dl Engine Swap Part Six, Getting the Clio 1.8 16v F7p Engine Back In

There’s two ways to drop the engine back in, one way makes life a lot easier but it doesn’t really matter.. If I ever have to do this again while I own the car (god forbid) I’d go for the easier one. The easier one is leaving the sump off till the engine is back in the car. This helps with clearance quite a lot.  The Volvo and Clio sump are both very deep so taking it off makes a world of difference.

dropping new f7p in

However, I wasn’t aware of this at the time, but we managed to drop it in with the sump on. You definitely need a few people to help since it’s not the easiest thing to manoeuvre around. Once it’s lowered in to the engine bay you have move it around till it sits in the mounting plates.

It is relatively straight forward after you get one of the mounts in, it just needs a bit of messing around to get it sat right in the bay.lining up f7p in volvo  with the crane

Best thing to do is start with the bellhousing mounts at the rear of the engine, but put a nut on as you get the screw threads through the mounting holes, then tighten it enough so you can still move it around on the crane to line up the front mounts. It’s a hell of a lot easier doing it back to front this way, and it allows for prop fitting.

Time to get the prop on.The Haynes manual and everything else will say take prop off and put it back in while everything is all in car, tried that. It was ridiculously hard. Fortunately we found a very simple, hassle free (guaranteed less damaging way) of doing it.

f7p volvo 360

Again the problem with prop fitting is manoeuvrability and space. So with the front engine mounts loose, we basically pulled up the front of the engine with the crane. You can do this with everything connected aswell.  That slight pivot is more than enough to make getting the prop on and off a breeze.

When your taking the prop on or off. Always knock it as far back as it will go first, then it will just clear the front clutch spline enough for you to tilt the engine up and pull the prop out. Otherwise the clutch spline is in the way of the rubber surround on the prop. As you knock it forward, its still stuck on the gearbox end enough to prevent you pulling or levering it down.

Once the prop is on both splines knock it forward till you’ve got an even amount of spline visible at both ends, a good thumb/two finger width is enough on either end. Then put the prop clamps back on. Theres an indentation where the screw thread of the prop clamp goes, make sure its sat properly on that either end and tighten it up as best you can. You might need to get someone on the clutch, to move the prop around to make life easier.

Thats  it engine back in! Next I’ll be looking at wiring and preparations for first turnover

engine in

  1. Volvo 340dl F7p Renault Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap/Replacement Part 1
  2. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Valver Engine Swap Part Two
  3. Volvo 340 1.8 16v F7p Engine Swap, Taking the Engine Out Part Three
  4. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v F7p Part Four, Prepping the New F7p To Go In!
  5. Volvo 340 Valver F7p Part Five 1.7 Bellhousing and Clutch Assembly
  6. Volvo 340dl Engine Swap Part Six, Getting the Clio 1.8 16v F7p Engine Back In
  7. Volvo 340 Valver Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap Final Part, Getting it Running
  8. Volvo 340dl 1.8 16v Engine Swap Resources

Pages

My Car

Volvo 340 1.8 16V f7P Valver First Drive Pictures and Wash

Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Retro Drift Car Build Pictures

 

Permanent link to this article: http://carsandcoolstuff.com/2013/03/volvo-340dl-engine-swap-part-six-getting-the-clio-1-8-16v-f7p-engine-back-in/

Mar 21

Volvo 340 Valver F7p Part Five 1.7 Bellhousing and Clutch Assembly

Now we come to the importance of the spigot bearing, It took me two attempts of taking the prop off, taking the bellhousing off, pulling the clutch off ( we had the engine back in the car by this time) to figure out I needed a spigot bearing. This simple little item would of saved me a whole days worth of scratching my head and taking the bellhousing off all the time to figure out what was wrong with the car. The part number for this is 6302 and you can get them pretty much anywhere, it’s a very universal part.spigot bearing 6302

Basically the spigot bearing is quite literally a simple little guide for the clutch shaft going in to the flywheel. The clutch shaft on Clio’s is a lot bigger than on the Volvo’s so this isn’t necessary but if you try to engage the clutch without this in a Volvo you could do a lot of damage.Spigot Bearing in Clio f7p flywheel

So with that in mind, Make sure you put one in before you get to where I did with the engine back in the car!

Putting the bellhousing and clutch assembly together was one of the easiest parts of the build for sure. This is another one of those things that’s ten times easier to do with it out of the car. It’s always a good point in time to fit a new clutch, release bearing and pressure plate as well.

The bellhousing contains the thrust release bearing which sits on the release arm. This is very simply released by a safety pin mechanism, then you pull the release bearing off the spline and swap it for the new one.

bolting volvo 1.7 parts on f7p

The clutch itself is a very simple thing to swap as well. That’s held in by the pressure plate which is bolted to the back of the block, on top of the flywheel with Allen bolts. Once you undo those bolts the cover comes  off and the clutch drops out, just reverse the process for putting the new one on.

It’s worth lining it up initially to make sure the pressure plate slips on without any hassles, but part of bolting the bellhousing back on to the engine means it needs to be lined up. This is a sure fire way to make sure it’s all together properly because if it’s not lined up it won’t go on!  You know it’s lined up when the bellhousing is sat flush on the back of the engine all the way round.volvo 440 turbo clutch

The last things to do then is attach the flywheel sensor to the top of the bellhousing and put the rear engine mounts on. Now it’s ready to go in!

  1. Volvo 340dl F7p Renault Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap/Replacement Part 1
  2. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Valver Engine Swap Part Two
  3. Volvo 340 1.8 16v F7p Engine Swap, Taking the Engine Out Part Three
  4. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v F7p Part Four, Prepping the New F7p To Go In!
  5. Volvo 340 Valver F7p Part Five 1.7 Bellhousing and Clutch Assembly
  6. Volvo 340dl Engine Swap Part Six, Getting the Clio 1.8 16v F7p Engine Back In
  7. Volvo 340 Valver Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap Final Part, Getting it Running
  8. Volvo 340dl 1.8 16v Engine Swap Resources

Pages

My Car

Volvo 340 1.8 16V f7P Valver First Drive Pictures and Wash

Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Retro Drift Car Build Pictures

 

Permanent link to this article: http://carsandcoolstuff.com/2013/03/volvo-340-valver-f7p-1-7-bellhousing-and-clutch-assembly/

Mar 21

Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v F7p Part Four, Prepping the New F7p To Go In!

Hard part of getting the old engine out done. Time to start prepping the new engine! This is where the exciting stuff begins.  The best part about prepping the new engine is it’s 10 times easier to do stuff straight away, since it’s not actually in the car!

If you’ve bought the engine straight from a clio like I did, First thing is to check if there’s any oil in it. This is a good chance to examine the true state of the engine.  First thing we did was get in on a crane and undo the sump plug. Mine had plenty of oil in it and it was spot on with no obvious residue or bits in it at all, as it should be. This suggested straight away it was probably in perfect working order not long ago.

Now it was just a case of putting parts back on that we took back off, keeping a few things in mind obviously. While the engine is out of the car, this is the best time ever to change all the gaskets, top and bottom due to access. Not forgetting a whole cambelt kit aswell. It can get quite expensive getting everything together. But its well worth it. Especially if you don’t want to be pulling the whole engine out again!

After we drained the oil, the first thing we did was start on the sump, you have to replace the clio sump for the Volvo one due to the engine mounting brackets being on the drivers side of the Volvo one.

This was another one of those things that should be straight forward but rarely is! To start with it has 20 torx screws! Two of them are hidden, so find those before you start smashing away at the sump to separate it from the block. This will take a long time, due to the torx bolts obviously being torqued up from the factory and almost 20 years of sitting on the engine.

Little tip for removing the torx screws if your struggling, use loads of wd40, rust remover, bolt lubricant or something like that, knock them with a chisel and hammer first to “shock” them a bit or remove excess rust around the threads, then when you go to put the torx piece in, gently and throughly knock it in with a hammer so you know the load distribution will be even when it finally comes to undoing it.

Once all those are off the sump should pull away relatively easily.

clio sump

You should then see a plastic windage tray around the oil sender. This may need a bit of trimming to accommodate the Volvo sump. You’ll see straightaway what area needs trimming. It’s not much at all and it makes no difference to the effectiveness of the tray. The previous engine I had didn’t have any of this plastic trimming in it.

This may of contributed towards its failure as the oil level got low or the car was accelerating, cornering hard etc. It’s possible there was points in time when the oil sender was completely starved of oil, thus starving parts of the engine, this is what windage trays prevent from happening.

The next step is bolting the bellhousing and clutch assembly together… then engine is more or less ready to go back in!

  1. Volvo 340dl F7p Renault Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap/Replacement Part 1
  2. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Valver Engine Swap Part Two
  3. Volvo 340 1.8 16v F7p Engine Swap, Taking the Engine Out Part Three
  4. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v F7p Part Four, Prepping the New F7p To Go In!
  5. Volvo 340 Valver F7p Part Five 1.7 Bellhousing and Clutch Assembly
  6. Volvo 340dl Engine Swap Part Six, Getting the Clio 1.8 16v F7p Engine Back In
  7. Volvo 340 Valver Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap Final Part, Getting it Running
  8. Volvo 340dl 1.8 16v Engine Swap Resources

Pages

My Car

Volvo 340 1.8 16V f7P Valver First Drive Pictures and Wash

Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Retro Drift Car Build Pictures

 

Permanent link to this article: http://carsandcoolstuff.com/2013/03/volvo-340dl-1-8-16v-f7p-part-four-prepping-the-new-f7p-to-go-in/

Mar 21

Volvo 340 1.8 16v F7p Engine Swap, Taking the Engine Out Part Three

Our third day of work started a bit later than we had planned!, we were both out on the town the night before so the morning consisted of Coffee, a cheeky fryup and a bit of down time to reflect on the previous nights shenanigans, and physcing ourselves up to tackle the mountain before us!

Today was the day the old engine was finally coming out!

Engine Crane Rope Clio 16v 1.8

The last thing stopping us from removing the engine was the clutch cable, attached to the bellhousing. This was a nice simple task which we tackled quickly and got us in the mood for some serious engine removal.

The clutch cable is attached at the back of the clutch pedal with a simple bolt. In order to remove it you need to first take off the bit of trim, attached to the underside of the steering column. This will then give you access to that bolt. Once you have access and the bolt is undone the clutch cable is then free. Now you just have to pull it through the bulkhead and release the engine mounts and your good to go!

Volvo 340dl 1.7 Engine Mount Removal

To summarize then, Removing the engine involved the following, My situation may be a bit different to yours if your doing the swap from scratch, theres a lot more to it, but if you already have all the parts in place or have a proper 1.7 340 or 360 volvo, theres not much more to it.

  • Disconnect all the water pipes from the back of the block and the radiator
  • Remove and label all the various plugs and sensors, take notes of the cables that don’t connect to anything aswell
  • Remove the Air filter/ air box
  • Remove The Fuel Rail
  • Remove the inlet manifold
  • Remove the prop
  • Release the engine mounts
  • TAKE LOTS OF PICTURES!!

As you can see there isn’t much to it at all, and it is a very simple engine swap/ replacement. The hard part comes when you get started on the above tasks. A whole day was more or less taken up by removing the prop due to seized bolts.  The other thing was the design of the inlet manifold that made it hard to get to the bolts under the manifold to undo it, simple things like this are where your time goes!

So, Once we released the engine mounts ( to find out one of them had completely failed!) the engine was free. To stop the engine literally hitting the floor we had it under tension on the engine crane to help with removal and steadying of the mounts.

Failed Engine Mount

It still wasn’t the easiest of tasks and it helps if you have a few mates for sure, we very slowly started to raise the engine out and started to find cables and things were getting caught on various parts of the engine, so when you come to do it yourself, take it easy and make sure everyone’s alert.

We almost damaged my brake lines as they were getting caught on the end of the bellhousing. They were in a kind of awkward place that made them hard to see. It wasn’t until we looked in detail that we found out, as soon as we got around that the engine was free. The lesson here is think and look closely if your removing an engine. If it seems or feels like it’s getting caught on something..thats usually because it is!

Volvo 340 Brake Lines

Something to bear in mind (this would of made it a lot easier when it comes to clearance) as mentioned in jon-ovlov’s guide. Take the sump off when pulling the engine out of the car, and put the sump back in when the engine is back in the car. This makes it a lot easier to pull out and put back in.

The saga didn’t end there though, the engine was out and free but we didn’t have enough clearance. We couldn’t suspend the engine high enough out of the engine bay due to the bellhousing and sump, and we couldn’t push the car back either..big problem. This is where a bit of ingenuity was needed!

Fortunately my dad is good at this sort of thing so he suggested we wrap the tether suspending the engine from the crane around the hook, in essence to make it shorter, thus pull the engine up.  We did this and it worked well, but the engine was far from clear still!

After a bit more pondering we found a couple of planks of wood and used them as leavers to get that bit more height on the engine crane by resting one under the crank and another at the rear end of the engine on the sump.  It still wasn’t really enough so while I was sat on the sump bit of wood and pressing the other bit of wood by the crank down, my friend had tilt the engine at an angle while my dad pushed it as hard as he could along the wood to clear the front of the engine bay!

As you can see we were very pleased with the result and thought it was a good point to call it a day!

Clio 1.8 16v f7p Oil removal

  1. Volvo 340dl F7p Renault Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap/Replacement Part 1
  2. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Valver Engine Swap Part Two
  3. Volvo 340 1.8 16v F7p Engine Swap, Taking the Engine Out Part Three
  4. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v F7p Part Four, Prepping the New F7p To Go In!
  5. Volvo 340 Valver F7p Part Five 1.7 Bellhousing and Clutch Assembly
  6. Volvo 340dl Engine Swap Part Six, Getting the Clio 1.8 16v F7p Engine Back In
  7. Volvo 340 Valver Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap Final Part, Getting it Running
  8. Volvo 340dl 1.8 16v Engine Swap Resources

Pages

My Car

Volvo 340 1.8 16V f7P Valver First Drive Pictures and Wash

Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Retro Drift Car Build Pictures

 

Permanent link to this article: http://carsandcoolstuff.com/2013/03/volvo-340-1-8-16v-f7p-engine-swap-taking-the-engine-out-part-three/

Mar 20

Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Valver Engine Swap Part Two

Our next day of Volvo  Valver  work was as good as it was bad, since we’d disconnected and labelled up a lot of the wiring and small things, alot of stuff could just go. We started by pulling off a lot of the radiator hoses and there was just water and anti-freeze..everywhere. Every time we moved a pipe, even more just seemed to come from nowhere!

I knew there would be a lot of water but wasn’t expecting as much as there was! Some of the neighbours weren’t to impressed.

Renault Clio 16v Phase 1 Engine Water Pump Arrangement

It really is much simpler than I thought it would be in many respects. All the piping and hosing is just held on with jubilee clips basically. Again we were labelling the parts up we thought we’d get confused over or if there was alot of hoses in one area.

The next step was removing the inlet manifold, should be pretty simple right? Well in theory it is because it’s just held on by bolts, but it’s the accessibility that’s the problem. The top ones were no problem, but the bottom ones just weren’t happening.   But after much persistence and very bloody knuckles, we managed to get it off!

The irony is, it’ll be a 10 minute job putting it on the new engine outside of the car!

Now  it’s about  getting the prop off  so we can lift the engine out..again more problems! The prop is held on either end by what is essentially a C-Clamp with a 6mm hex bolt pulling either side of the clamp together tightening the spline, so you need an alan key, again this should be nice and simple to remove, but nope the bolt was completely seized. The only way we could get if off was by sheering the head off the bolt. This worked, but I had some seriously damaged prop clamps.

The Prop was still really hard to get off, but something we learnt, that made prop swapping/taking off/ putting back in a 10 minute job, is use an engine crane. There’s no space to manoeuvre the prop backwards and forwards with the gearbox and engine in place (contrary to what the Haynes manual says) so loosen up the front engine mounts enough to lift and tilt the whole engine, all it needs is a bit of angle on it and it makes the process simple as.

ALWAYS CHECK YOU HAVE THE SPLINES LINED UP! On the input shafts either end of the prop ..otherwise you’ll just spin them as soon as you move the car.

Getting Ready To Remove Clio 16v phase 1 engine

We were on a role at this point and disconnected the alternator in a matter of minutes.

So this is why it was as good as it was bad, we got alot done, but it took a lot longer than it should of done to do it.

  1. Volvo 340dl F7p Renault Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap/Replacement Part 1
  2. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Valver Engine Swap Part Two
  3. Volvo 340 1.8 16v F7p Engine Swap, Taking the Engine Out Part Three
  4. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v F7p Part Four, Prepping the New F7p To Go In!
  5. Volvo 340 Valver F7p Part Five 1.7 Bellhousing and Clutch Assembly
  6. Volvo 340dl Engine Swap Part Six, Getting the Clio 1.8 16v F7p Engine Back In
  7. Volvo 340 Valver Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap Final Part, Getting it Running
  8. Volvo 340dl 1.8 16v Engine Swap Resources

Pages

My Car

Volvo 340 1.8 16V f7P Valver First Drive Pictures and Wash

Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Retro Drift Car Build Pictures

 

Permanent link to this article: http://carsandcoolstuff.com/2013/03/volvo-340dl-1-8-16v-valver-engine-swap-part-two/

Mar 20

Volvo 340dl F7p Renault Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap/Replacement Part 1

Before you start to read this all, I  just want to state this isn’t an exact “how to” to do an engine swap for these cars, look at it more as a “project/build thread”. It’s more a loose guide and my experience, with a few tips and notes I didn’t find in other guides or build threads. I’ve provided a resources page with everything I used and all my research though so this might be a good help to.

I’ve also provided an extensive photo gallery of everything from start to finish. This helped me immensely when putting it all back together. All the links are at the bottom of the page.

I think quite a few people have heard of Clio Williams engines and 1.8 valver engines going in Volvo’s now, it’s become a incredibly common engine swap, especially among the drift scene. What your looking at here is one of those.

I was rather unfortunate with my one though, within a month of owning it, the bottom end failed on me. The car still ran pretty spot on, but sounded awful. As soon as you got to about 3K rpm it sounded like a bag of nails was flying around the cylinders. But I managed to drive it till it seized on me . The sound just got worse and worse, then as I was driving home from work I lost all power and the rear wheels locked up momentarily. A scary few moments for sure!

Super Clean Volvo 340 Retro Drift CarGangsta Slammed Volvo Drifter

Engine seizing is quite literally just that. The engine stopping,  If there’s drive to the wheels (i.e. its in gear when it happens) they will lock up as if you pulled the hand break on a rear wheel drive car, and on a front wheel  drive car, the front wheels will lock up, god knows what happens in a four wheel drive car! I bet its a very sudden stop!

You shouldn’t really be driving a car round when it’s that bad, but needs must for me unfortunately. The lesson here if someone is in a similar boat is don’t drive it. Unless you really, absolutely have too. If you are driving it, don’t go above 40 and be ready to throw it in to neutral at all times. This is how I managed it on my car. Putting it in neutral prevents the locking up.

Volvo 340 WilliamsEither way it’s not something you expect to do after just getting the car! The brief time I did have driving it, I was completely bowled over, that engine is perfect for this car and rwd. It sounded awesome aswell.  A proper  DOHC  throaty soundtrack, just like the old escort rally cars. I’m told that bottom end failures on F7 engines are rare… lets hope so, it hasn’t been terribly cheap or easy sourcing all the parts.

That said, heres a lesson or thought to take in to consideration right now. My Volvo Valver is fuel injection which requires a engine management system, engine management systems are tailored to the specific models of engines, in my case an f7p e722. This was the hard part for me, finding the exact engine so it would be plug and play. If I bike carbed or throttle bodied it though, I would of saved a lot of time sourcing the exact engine, and I could of gone for any. Simply because its management is tuning related. These f7p and f7r engines are readily available and pretty inexpensive as well if your not picky.

F7p Cylinder Head

The difference between the f7p and f7r is simple, the f7p is a 1.8 16v and the f7r is a 2.0l 16v. The 2.0l is the “Williams” engine, while they are more or less the same engines, be prepared to pay a premium for the latter of the two. The Cylinder head internal design is slightly different aswell. A common conversion for Williams engines is to drop a 1.8 f7p cylinder head on. This allows for higher revs aswell.

A F7r is limited at around 6500k, I don’t know if this is stock for mine but it goes well over 7K revs on the clock i think it stops about 7200-7500.

So what do you need to do this swap to your Volvo? Basically all Volvo 1.7 parts, but these cars have got very rare now, so it’s not as easy as it was even a year a go. On the flip side, This conversion is so common, it wouldn’t be hard for you to find one that’s already done if that’s what your after.

Heres a shortlist, I got from this page:  http://volvo340.wikispaces.com/home

  • 1.7 sump
  • 1.7 bellhousing
  • 1.7 clutch
  • 1.7 clutch cable (although a 1.4 can be used with a bit of inginuety)
  • 1.7 front engine mounts (Rhs 3 bolt bracket to block – Lhs 3 bolt bracket to sump)
  • 1.7 LHS rear bellhousing mount (1.4 can be used with a little trimming to clear clutch fork)( have had no clearance issues-kaos)
  • 1.7 alternator mounts
  • 1.7 “T” piece from behind waterpump (Not needed if you wont be running heaters – kaos)
  • 1.7 water pipes(kaos)
  • 1.7/1.4 water temp sender(kaos)

Something else I want to add to this list, and I’ll explain later

In my case, I have a bit of a head start since all these parts were put on the car by the previous owner for the conversion! Lucky me..the hard part now is dismantling everything. To make sure the process of putting it all back together is pretty straightforward, we’ve been labelling and photographing absolutely everything as a reference before disassembly starts.

When I say everything, I mean loose wires and spare sockets etc aswell. i.e. down by the alternator there appears to be a couple of cables not in use, same goes to the fuse box aswell. Theres a couple of cables round there that aren’t actually connected to anything.

Our first day was a bit slow, we were just thoroughly making sure everything was disconnected properly and studying how things came apart. Theres lots of sensors and bits and pieces like that all over the engine. But the good thing is, its all plugs. We also found out alot of the wires and connectors were a very specific length meaning they couldn’t go anywhere else if you tried.

This, accompanied by our labelling should make it a lot easier to put it back in, stay tuned for day two!

 

  1. Volvo 340dl F7p Renault Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap/Replacement Part 1
  2. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Valver Engine Swap Part Two
  3. Volvo 340 1.8 16v F7p Engine Swap, Taking the Engine Out Part Three
  4. Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v F7p Part Four, Prepping the New F7p To Go In!
  5. Volvo 340 Valver F7p Part Five 1.7 Bellhousing and Clutch Assembly
  6. Volvo 340dl Engine Swap Part Six, Getting the Clio 1.8 16v F7p Engine Back In
  7. Volvo 340 Valver Clio 1.8 16v Engine Swap Final Part, Getting it Running
  8. Volvo 340dl 1.8 16v Engine Swap Resources

Pages

My Car

Volvo 340 1.8 16V f7P Valver First Drive Pictures and Wash

Volvo 340DL 1.8 16v Retro Drift Car Build Pictures

Permanent link to this article: http://carsandcoolstuff.com/2013/03/volvo-340dl-f7p-renault-clio-1-8-16v-engine-swapreplacement-part-1/

Jan 04

Drifting at Japfest 2012

This footage I think was from an in lap, But there’s still a bit of action going on!

 

Japfest 2012 Show Report Part 1

Japfest 2012 Show Report Part 2

Japfest 2012 Show Report Part 3

Journey To Japfest Video

Drifting At Japfest Quarry Corner, Castlecombe

Japfest Drift Session

Drifting at Japfest


Permanent link to this article: http://carsandcoolstuff.com/2013/01/drifting-at-japfest-2012/

Jan 04

Japfest Drift Session At Castle Combe Circuit in Wiltshire

This is a bit more footage from one of the first Drift Sessions early on in the day at Japfest 2012

Japfest 2012 Show Report Part 1

Japfest 2012 Show Report Part 2

Japfest 2012 Show Report Part 3

Journey To Japfest Video

Drifting At Japfest Quarry Corner, Castlecombe

Japfest Drift Session

Drifting at Japfest


Permanent link to this article: http://carsandcoolstuff.com/2013/01/japfest-drift-session-at-castle-combe-circuit-in-wiltshire/

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